Frank Bowling, whose 1960s work ‘Cover Girl’ features in a LRG double portrait of his sons, opens at Tate Britain tomorrow.

A retrospective of the work of abstract expressionist Frank Bowling OBE RA, whose 1960s painting ‘Cover Girl’ features in an LRG double portrait of his sons by Stella Tooth, opens at the Tate Britain tomorrow until 26 August.

The work featured in the Lots Road Group’s exhibition last year ‘Connected: the changing face of Britain‘ and explains, in the devisive times of Brexit, how the artist is connected to his sons.

Ben, on the left of the painting, says: “Cover Girl’ is one of dad’s 60s pop-art painting that points to his future abstract work. Above the female figure is a stencilled image of Bowling’s Variety Store, Frank’s childhood home in New Amsterdam, British Guiana. The painting connects we two brothers, born in the 1969s, with our father, his art and autobiographical references that are part of our heritage.”

On graduating with a silver medal in painting from the Royal College in 1962, Frank Bowling left London for New York, fleeing attempts to pigeon-hole and exclude him from the mainstream of British art. After years of transatlantic commuting he settled in London where, in his eighties, he still paints every day. His Tate Britain retrospective will establish Frank as one of today’s most brilliant painters and illustrates, in vivid colour, how Britain has change in the last half century.

Stella’s connection with her sitters: “I met Ben when studying with his German wife Susi and was introduced to Frank at one of Ben and Susi’s Christmas parties. Nowadays, I meet Susi and Ben at the Tate whenever I’m teaching drawing there for Sketchout Recently, Ben, who’s a Professor of Criminology at Kings College, London and writes songs and performs with his band ‘Doc Bowling and his Blues Professors’ as does his wife Susi, a senior lecturer at Goldsmiths, jointly commissioned me to draw Johannes, their saxophonist son, as I now specialise in portraying performers. Early last year I noticed one of Frank’s Tate paintings was missing – Mirror, on loan to the Royal Academy – and Ben explained that he and Sacha are starting to help their father to manage his formidable body of work held in private and public collections worldwide and the idea for the painting was born!”

An extract from the LRG’s Connected catalogue

To read a preview of Frank Bowling’s Retrospective at the Tate Britain click here

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